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The Spartan Pledge

At the height of ancient Greek power, the Spartans became one of the most feared military forces in the world.

Today, Spartan power is being channeled into a few powerful sentences known as THE SPARTAN PLEDGE. When spoken, these words become more than just a promise - they create a community of warfighters ready to crush a new enemy - Suicide.

What is THE SPARTAN PLEDGE?

The Spartan Pledge is a commitment among veterans to not take their own lives but rather stand for their fellow soldiers in times of despair. It’s a promise to say that no matter how bad things get you, that you will reach out.

The Spartan Pledge Mission - To Save Another Life Today. We are bringing awareness that suicide can be stopped.

The Spartan Pledge Goal - To get every veteran and military member to take THE SPARTAN PLEDGE.

THE SPARTAN PLEDGE

I pledge that:

  • No matter how bad things get, I will not take my own life.
  • If I’m in despair (feeling hopeless or depressed), then I promise to reach out - to call a friend.
  • If my military family ever considers suicide or is in despair, then I will help them find a mission worth living for.
  • I will save a life today.

If you’re a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one,
there are helpful, qualified VA responders standing by to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. call 1-800-273-8255 and press 1.

How can you help Make THE SPARTAN PLEDGE go viral

  • Post a daily video of yourself saying The Spartan Pledge
  • Post a video of yourself doing 22 Push-ups (or some type of exercise) in support of The Spartan Pledge. “To show my commitment to THE SPARTAN PLEDGE, I am doing 22 Push-ups. I will save another life today.”
  • Ask your friends to join you in The Spartan Pledge
  • Display The Spartan Pledge at your place of work, place of worship, your local hang-out, your refrigerator.
  • Proudly wear The Spartan Pledge gear and swag
  • Have a fundraiser for The Spartan Pledge 7. Become a Volunteer

Since The Spartan Pledge was first introduced to the veteran community, the oath has swept across social media and vets have taken the pledge at everything from backyard-get-togethers to concerts to virtual gatherings via YouTube and Skype. However, nothing shows the real success of this anti-suicide pact, better than the vets who have taken it.

“It was one of the worst times of my life ... it left me with memories I could never get rid of,” said David Sousa, as he described his 2003 deployment to Abu Gharib. “Because of the stuff that happens when you’re at war, and the things that you do, you’re never the same person when you come back,” Sousa explained.

“I was doing pretty good at coping with life until I went back to Afghanistan ... and that’s when it all started to unwind,” Sousa said.

After returning home, he described a hell that only few can truly understand, “I was depressed, I became more and more anxious by the day ... In my mind I saw things over and over again... Things I can’t even talk. I couldn’t take it. A couple times I had the notion of committing suicide, and then there was the time I actually tried. I had a gun, and let’s just say I ..." He trails off.
“What kinda changed my life was when my friend killed himself,” Sousa recalled. “It was tragic for everyone. I saw how suicide didn’t help him and the people around him. It just made it worse. That’s when I decided to get help.”

Sousa’s help came in the form of a friendship with a World War II vet that introduced him to The Spartan Pledge. “It hit home. It drives you and makes you remember that you have a purpose in life. By sharing it with others, I have found an incredible camaraderie with others who were sharing it ... it brought the warfighter community back together for me.”

As Sousa reflected on his oath, to not take his own life, he found himself on a mission bigger than himself. ”More than an oath to not kill myself today, if I know that you’re in distress, I’m going to go out there and find you, help you, stand up for you. The pledge creates an awareness in your mind that there are people who I can go and help.”

Take The Spartan Pledge today.

Giving to those in need what they could be gaining from their own initiative may well be the kindest way to destroy people.

If you’re a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one, there are helpful, qualified VA responders standing by to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. VA Crisis Line call 1-800-273-8255 and press 1.

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